Bookshelf

"Angenieux and Cinema, from Light to Image"

Books and Magazines

Communiqué
For quite some time, Angénieux has been thinking of doing a book to trace the incredible rise of the Angénieux brand, since the creation of the company in 1935. The dream has actually come true and the 270-page book with a French and an English edition will be previewed at NAB2019 before its international release in bookstores.

A Page has Turned
By Jean-Noël Ferragut, AFC

Columns

It is with a pang in my heart that in late June 2018, I will hear for the last time the continuous purring of the AFC’s printer carrying out the task that was assigned to it for the last quarter century. Namely, the reproduction of nearly three hundred copies of the AFC’s monthly Newsletter. Indeed, in the name of prudent cost-saving measures, and with a few rare exceptions that will confirm the rule, the Newsletter will only be available in PDF format, which each recipient will be able to print out if need be.

About the questioning of the European Commission lighting directive

Columns

The association of lighting designers (ALD) alerted the profession against a possible revision of the European Community lighting directive to the entertainment (Scenic, event, film and TV). I signed the petition from the ALD and I participated in the European Union survey to defend the LEDs and tungsten lighting technologies. Imago asked me for my opinion on the question. And here is what I replied.

Kazuo Miyagawa (1908 -1999)
By Marc Salomon, consulting member of the AFC

Bookshelf

In honour of the Kazuo Miyagawa retrospective, which is being held at the MoMA in New York from 12-29 April 2018, and the Kenji Mizoguchi retrospective (Miyagawa filmed many of his movies) taking place at the Cinémathèque Française through 15 April 2018, Marc Salomon, consulting member of the AFC, offers us the opportunity to look back on the career of this Japanese cinematographer.

Interview with Cinematographer Tom Stern, AFC, ASC, about his work on Clint Eastwood’s film “The 15:17 to Paris”
At 186 mph

Press clippings

An adaptation of the real-life event of August 2015 in which three young American tourists prevented carnage on board a Thalys train, The 15:17 to Paris is a strange cinematographic mix of fiction and reality. The movie stars the three heroes themselves, and the film transitions from an adaptation of a drama (about the three boys’ childhoods) to a sort of documentary-fiction style in which each element seems to have been drawn straight from reality, down to the integration of archival footage for the epilogue in the Elysée Palace. Tom Stern, AFC, ASC, the Californian director’s loyal cinematographer, explains the cinematographic issues facing this extra-ordinary film. (FR)

Quality in Digital Times - A Rolf Coulanges conference

Bookshelf

During the 2016 Micro Salon session dedicated to the CCTC (Committee for Creative Technologies in Cinematography) of Imago, Rolf Coulanges, BVK, delivered a ‘’concentrate’’ of the intervention he has made at the Oslo Digital Cinema Conference in Novembre 2015.

Jean-François Hensgens, AFC, SBC, speaks about his work on Joachim Lafosse’s “The White Knights”

Press and video interviews

Jean-François Hensgens is a SBC and AFC member. For instance, he has shot movies like Victor, by Philippe Martinez (2014), Turk’s Head, by Pascal Elbé (2010), District 13: Ultimatum, by Patrick Alessandrin (2009), Dikkenek, by Olivier Van Hoofstadt (2006), and Dark Tide, by John Stockwell (2012). The White Knights is his third collaboration with director Joachim Lafosse. They worked together in 2010 on Entre les mots (a short film) and in 2012 on Our Children.

Harry Stradling Sr., ASC (1902-1970), the very archetype of the Hollywood technique
By Marc Salomon, AFC Consultant Member

Bookshelf

On the occasion of the screening of Albert Lewin’s The Portrait of Dorian Gray at the Mac-Mahon Cinema in Paris on 2 December 2015, Marc Salomon, Consulting Member of the AFC, reflects upon the careers of one of Hollywood’s master directors of photography of the 1940s and 1950s: Harry Stradling Sr. “Nothing is too difficult because making movies is our job,” he used to say about his work.

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